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Sneakernomics: Tax Refund Delays Can Hurt the Sports Business

Feb 14, 2017
Matt Powell, Vice President, Senior Industry Advisor ;
Sports
@NPDMattPowell

In 2015 Congress passed the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act. One of the main provisions of PATH was to slow down taxpayer refunds for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and/or the Additional Child Tax Credit. The slowdown was intended to give the IRS more time to investigate for fraudulent claims. It is estimated that about 28 million taxpayers filed for EITC in recent years.

The effect of this slowdown in payments means that the IRS will not be issuing EITC refunds until February 15, 2017. Taking weekends, processing time, and the Presidents’ Day holiday into account, estimates are that refunds will not begin to be received until February 27, and many may extend into March.

EITC benefits low to middle income households with children. It allows parents to claim up to $3,300 for one child and more than $6,250 for three children. The magnitude of the credits is in the tens of billions of dollars.

Since most low to middle income families are living paycheck to paycheck, this tax credit is a financial windfall. Many low to middle income families spend their tax refunds as soon as they receive it.

The timing of the refund has a profound impact on sports retail, particularly sneaker sales. In years past, processing glitches have delayed refunds and the industry suffered until the refunds hit.

We can expect a soft February for sales of athletic footwear and apparel due to this new law. While the industry will make up these sales in March, it will make trending difficult and retailers and brands anxious. Coupled with a late Easter this year, Q1 will be a challenging one for the sports industry.



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